GTI-Legion training in Barnwell SC

GTI-Legion out in Barnwell SC invited South Carolina Carry to be a featured vendor during their Southeastern Gunfighter’s Congress featuring Jared Reston.   GTI or Government Training Industries is located on the site of a decommissioned nuclear power plant.  This training facility is equal to none in SC.  GTI hosts training for police depts and swat teams from all over the U.S.  GTI-Legion is their newly formed civilian training program which will bring a unique opportunity for civilians to experienced advanced gun fighting and markmanship skills.

This weekend’s event consists of two days of advanced gunfighter training being taught by Jared Reston and his group.  At the end of the day on Saturday we were able to eat dinner with the participants and then we attended the key note message by Jared Reston himself. Jared is the Sherrif Deputy in Jacksonville Florida who wound up in a force on force incident with an 18 year old shoplifter who fled on foot away from a mall where him and one of his friends decided to steal something from Belks.  Jared and his partner were working an off duty gig that evening.  Jared wound up having to chase the 18 year old shoplifter for a quarter mile where the fight ensued in a retention pond.  The force on force incident included the suspect pulling a Glock 22 handgun and shooting Jared point blank in the face and 7 other times on different parts of his body.  Jared stayed in the fight despite the hits he took and wound up killing the suspect.

While the training was geared towards law enforcement professionals there are several things that we can learn from his experience.

  • physical fitness is very important
  • having the mindset to win the fight
  • when your advesary decides to harm you, you have to be willing to use violence against them
  • force on force incidents happen fast and your subconscious mind takes over. You resort to the level of training you have acquired when you respond.
  • this is not Hollywood. When you shoot someone they do not always fall down dead like in the movies
  • regular training is vital to your winning the fight
  • range time is vital to your winning the fight
  • Survival is not an option but winning the fight is

My list of take away points are a paraphrased list of points that I heard during the keynote speech.  The important thing to take away from this is that there is no glamor when it comes to a force on force incident.  As civilians we are not going to (or should not) be chasing down criminals to apprehend them.  That is what the police sign up for when they put on the badge and gun every time they go on shift.  As a civilian you are going to be focused on keeping yourself and your family safe when you are at home or out in public.  Keeping your head on a swivel and practicing situational awareness will go a long way towards keeping you and your family safe.

If you find yourself in a force on force incident where you have to go hands on with an assailant it will not be a pleasant experience. Your goal is to WIN the fight and you will need to be willing to engage in the fight and return violence with violence.  You need to be mentally prepared to do this.  Your winning the fight is going to depend on your physical fitness and your level of training.  Training includes going to the range on a regular basis to sharpen your marksmenship skills.  It also includes force on force training that will be provided by companies such as GTI and other groups in South Carolina.  I do not care where you live, find the training you need.  Your life very well could depend on this.

 

 

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Armed Citizen’s Rules of Engagement by Massad Ayoob review

Have you ever attended an event and after it was over responded with, “Where did the time go?”  That’s what happened when I attended Massad Ayoob Group’s MAG-20 Classroom, Armed Citzens’ Rules of Engagement.  The two-day, 20-hour class was a combination of live lecture and video lecture (previous training classes).  I was slightly disappointed when he informed us of the video portion, but once he explained why the video was used it made perfect legal sense.  The use of video ensures that everyone who takes his training, no matter the location, receives the exact same training.  That reasoning is especially important if he was requested to render assistance at your self defense hearing.

He explored the necessity of being able to explain your action(s), and why if you can’t, you probably should not do it.  Be able to C.Y.A. and it’s not what you’re thinking.  Can you articulate what was happening at the time of the incident?  Can you authenticate your actions?

Other topics were from your SC-CWP class, times 10.  The topics covered were the same, but he expounded on it with his usual flair as he reached into his knowledge of cases for which he’s testified, ones he didn’t, professionals he knows, and various state case and statutory laws.

Additional topics included: The AOJ Triad (Ability, Opportunity and Jeopardy), Priorities of Survival and Standards of Proof, OODA Loop (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act), Doctrine of Competing Harms, and many more.

A section I found very interesting was how he demonstrated the link between COL Cooper’s Color Code of Awareness and the Standards of Proof.

Many people think: “two to the body, one to the head” is all you need to end the threat.  Where in the head?    What happens if you hit “here” or “there” on the body?  How will the bullet react?  How does the body react?  These are additional questions that Mas addressed.

The second day included Ramifications of Firearms Modifications and Related Issues (be able to C.Y.A.).  Can the name of your firearm or ammunition become an issue at trial, and can it be overcome by your attorney?

The class progressed into his Proprietary Information, need to take the class to find out what was included.

I realize this is an extremely broad overview of the class, and if you read the class info on MAG’s web site (https://massadayoobgroup.com) you might think: I know the rules of engagement, I’ve seen bullets hit ballistic gel, a lawyer won’t be able to trick me on the stand.  Why do I need to learn how to interact with suspects, witnesses, police officer?  I’ve read his book(s), I was in the military (police officer, lawyer, etc), I have my CWP.  Why should I give him $400 and twenty hours of my time?

Well, guess what?  The room was full of people from various backgrounds who, after the two days were over, were wondering where the time went and could he continue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1 Pictured DM Gill (left), Massad Ayoob (right)

By DG Training (https://www.facebook.com/DGTrainingLLC/)

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Thieves and Home Invasions in the Lowcountry

As I was watching channel 2 news this evening I heard about a home invasion in Crowfield in Goose Creek SC.  Crowfield is an upscale neighborhood in Goose Creek and there are some very nice homes there.  Those nice homes have or will become easy targets for thieves and people who will do home invasions.  Criminals look for soft targets.  Targets that are ripe for the picking. Sadly enough there are people that still believe that if they live in an upscale neighborhood they are exempt from the crimes that happen in lower income neighborhoods.  What are criminals looking for?

  • openly displayed christmas trees through the front windows
  • wrapped gifts that are visible from outside the home
  • no signs of burglar alarms
  • no signs of exterior lighting
  • unlocked vehicles
  • vehicles with valuables in plain sight
  • exterior doors that are unlocked
  • homes with shrubbery that allows a place for them to hide behind
  • packages left on the front porch

The home invasion occurred and an armed man broke into a home and sexually assaulted the female resident.  Then he told her to take him to the bank and withdraw money from her account.  Someone she got outside her home and started screaming for help.  I searched for the story online but could not find it.

Palmetto Concealed Carry was created to bring attention to the need for people to take their personal and family self defense seriously.  When the police are 10 minutes away crimes happen in the matter of minutes.  While crimes can happen any time or any day the Christmas season provides criminals with ripe hunting grounds.  Please pay attention to your surroundings.  Even when you are home you should arm your security system in the STAY mode so if someone does kick in one of your doors the alarm company will be alerted and they can call the police. The alarm going off will alert you to the unlawful entry and give you a few spare moments to get to your self defense weapon of choice.

This always boils down to planning, planning and more planning.  If you think this can never happen to you, please think again.  If it does happen and you are not prepared your life and the lives of your family members could be at risk.  Now is the time to take some common sense steps to protect you and your loved ones.  Do it now !!!

At the top of the website you will see a tab that says Self Defense Articles.  I wrote those articles with folks who are new to this in mind.  Please take the time to read those articles and feel free to ask questions.

Be safe and have a merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year.

 

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Facts on Open Carry by Tom Clark

Facts on Open Carry

Contrary to a May 7 letter writer’s assertions in a letter in the Sunday post – the proposed “Open Carry” legislation addresses only Concealable Weapons; those are defined as handguns that are 12 inches in length or less.

I don’t think he will find any laws regulating the open carrying of rifles and shotguns for non-criminal purposes in the South Carolina code. So the (AK-15s) about which he is concerned are not illegal to carry now – and how many people has he observed doing that?

I wonder too, if he is aware that 31 other states DO allow open carry? Are South Carolinians so childlike or undisciplined as to not be trusted as lawful gun owners elsewhere?

Interesting too I guess he is consolidating AR-15 and AK-47 into his catchall AR-47. The AR (Armalite Rifle) was designed in the USA and the AK (Avtomat Kalashnikova) designed in the USSR which are available to civilians in the USA are non-military semi-automatic rifles that fire only once each time the trigger is depressed like many other modern sporting rifles. The military versions are the full automatics seen on TV and the Movies – many confuse drama with reality – – a common error.

It was, is, and will be illegal to carry or use a firearm with criminal intent or use in a crime. Nothing in the proposed Law changes that. All the changes are directed to law-abiding gun owners

It was and will continue to be illegal to carry a firearm and consume alcoholic beverages in a place that sells alcohol for consumption on the premises.

Thomas E Clark

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Armed lifestyle

Let’s be honest for a moment.  Are there days when you get tired of carrying a concealed weapon on your body?  Believe it or not I have those days and I wind up having a mental tug of war between being lazy and being a responsible adult.  You wind up doing the what if game with yourself.  Your mind likes to play devils advocate and remind you that you have never had to use deadly force in the past so why should you expect to be faced with that today.  Just leave it at home or put it in your laptop bag and have it on the front seat.

The mental tug of war typically ends up with me putting on my IWB holster and holstering my EDC of choice for that day.  I fluctuate between my SW M&P PRO full sized .40 or my Walther PPQ M2 9mm.  I typically carry one or the other depending on how I feel about the extra weight of the .40 SW.  Yes, I do have a quality heavy duty gun belt so it supports the weight pretty well.  I also carry one extra mag.  I used to have a dual pouch mag holster that was OWB where I carried two spare mags.  Doing that added some extra weight on top of the weapon.  I quit carrying the mag holder for now.

As a legal gun owner I feel responsible for the safety of myself and my family.  Having said that I made a decision to do whatever I need to in order to be prepared.  That includes educating myself about local and state gun laws.  I go to the range on a regular basis and practice with all of my hand guns that I might carry.  I take my wife with me and encourage her to shoot whichever hand gun that she would chose to protect herself when I am not around. As a responsible gun owner and having obtained a CWP from the state of SC I also carry a defensive weapon concealed on my person.

Yes, there are days where I get mentally and physically lazy and I want to compromise my safety for comfort.  When I find myself in that mental tug of war between safety and comfort I ask myself a couple of questions.  What are you going to do when the crap hits the fan and you are eyeball to eyeball with a bad guy who has decided he wants to ruin your day and you left your self defense weapon at home or in the car?  I ask myself if I am willing to risk my life for the sake of some momentary convenience or comfort.  It is always better to have your defensive firearm on your person in a holster and not need it then to need it and not have it.

With the dog days of summer around the corner I will need to get another M&P Shield or a smaller Ruger handgun that I can put in a sticky holster in my shorts so I will always be a responsibly armed citizen that is prepared to protect myself and loved ones.

I would love to hear your stories about how you deal with this.

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Low Country Virtual Firearms Range in West Ashley

If you live in the lowcountry of South Carolina and are close to West Ashley then you might be interested in visiting the Low Country Virtual Firearms Range on Savannah Hwy.

I met with Paul who is the owner and was able to shoot both weapons and chose the plane hostage scenario.  This is much better than plinking lead down range at a non moving target.  It will get your blood pumping as you are placed in a shoot or don’t shoot scenario.

Go by sometime and tell Paul that you heard about his range at Palmetto Concealed Carry.

 

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In search of the perfect bullet by Roy Freeman

Why the .40 Smith & Wesson is still an excellent choice for personal protection or “in search of the perfect bullet”.

I saw a question in a well-travelled Facebook page asking “Why carry a .40 over a 9mm”.  My quick go-to answer is usually Energy!

Why is bullet energy important?  Simply put, the more energy, the more damage.  In order to neutralize an attacker, the bullet must either do damage to the brain or brain stem; or it must cause organs to shut down or at least not work correctly.  This is done by the damage to tissue through direct impact and by expending its energy into the body.  As a bullet passes through tissue, the energy from the bullet is transferred into the body causing a “temporary wound cavity” in which the shockwave from that expended energy causes damage to nearby organs.  This doesn’t mean that accuracy is not important.  That temporary or stretch cavity is usually only an inch or two wide, so bullets must at least pass very close to (or preferrably through) the vital organs such as the heart or liver.  The individual in defense of his or a loved one’s life must still do their part, so practice, practice, practice!

My thinking is that the right combination of bullet weight, velocity, and terminal performance (bullet expansion and the resulting wound cavity) would greatly figure in to the answer to the age old question “Which caliber and bullet has the best stopping power”? But I figured I should do at least a little research to see if my choice of caliber and thus my answer had any validity.  It would indeed be a daunting task to test all available factory ammunition in even the 3 most common pistol calibers.  So using the following websites, I put together this little investigative essay. I highly recommend checking out the Lucky Gunner website to view other information regarding the ammunition available and other aspects of the test results such as bullet expansion.  See how your defensive ammo stands up…You may be very surprised!

Ballistic Energy (at the muzzle) as calculated via http://www.ballistics101.com/muzzle_energy_calc.php

and using ballistic test results from http://www.luckygunner.com/labs/self-defense-ammo-ballistic-tests/

Starting with common “light for caliber”, non+P factory cartridges:

Example #1:  9mm Luger Corbon 115gr DPX with a muzzle velocity of 1123 fps (the fastest Non +P I found at luckygunner.com) yields a Muzzle Energy of 322 foot lbs. and penetrated to an average 13.9 inches in ballistec gelatin after passing through 4 layers of various types of cloth. (Not exactly per IWBA protocol, but it’s close and since all tests were done the same way, this still provides a relevant comparison).

Example #2:  .40 S&W Remington 165gr Golden Saber leaving the muzzle at 1113 fps (fastest 165 gr.) yields a muzzle energy of a whopping 454 foot lbs. Average 5 shot penetration through 4 layers of cloth into the ballistic gel was 19.6″ and average bullet expansion comes to .66″.  Good performance, but perhaps a little too much penetration.

Example #3:  .45 ACP Speer 185 gr Gold Dot gave the highest Non+P muzzle velocity clocking in at 954 feet per second, resulting in an average muzzle energy of only 374 ft-lbs.  The 5 shot average for penetration was an acceptable 14.1 inches and Average expanded diameter was .72 inches.

So the previous examples made me think I should be comparing the 230 grain bullet in .45 ACP since it is not only heavier and should theoretically show better perfomance, but also because 230 grain ammo is the most commonly available (especially in practice ammunition) and we should all be practicing with the same weight bullet as our defensive ammo, right?

Thus I give you Example #4: .45 ACP Winchester 230gr PDX-1 (Non +P) at 863 fps yields a muzzle energy of only 380 foot lbs.  (definitely NOT the performance numbers I was expecting)!!!  Not only that, but bullet terminal performance didn’t look good either 21.6″ average penetration and .61″ average expansion, with some failing to expand properly (although a couple of bullets appear to have followed the track of other projectiles, giving little resistance to open up the bullet and bring it to a stop).

So how dissappointing is that?!!!  We can do better, right?  Let’s look at some .45+P results for comparison.

Example #5:  .45 ACP Magtech 185gr Guardian Gold +P at 1057 fps yields a muzzle energy of 459 foot lbs. (Pretty good, but not significantly greater than the .40 due to it being slower and not much heavier).  This is another fast, heavy .45 that over-penetrates in ballistic gelatin with an average of 29.4 inches and all 5 failed to expand, measuring .45″. May as well use hardball!

Example #6:  .45 ACP Hornady 230 gr XTP +P with muzzle velocity of 908 fps gives us a Muzzle Energy of 421 ft-lbs.

Man oh man, the .45 is supposed to be king of the hill!  What the bleep is going on here?!!!

After playing around a bit, I did find a .45 load that absolutely smokes!

Example #7: .45 ACP Liberty 78 gr Civil Defense +P which comes charging out of the muzzle of their test gun at an amazing 1844 feet per second yielding an astounding 589 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle!  That’s gonna leave a mark!

Wow, that must be too good to be true! Sadly it is indeed disappointing in that such a light weight bullet sheds its energy so quickly that it doesn’t penetrate in ballistic gel very far. (A 5 shot average of 10.9 inches. Where the FBI standard is 12-18 inches and likewise, the expansion was very poor at .47 inches average diameter, ending up looking like a smaller than dime sized disk.  I doubt it would get much further past the rib cage of an attacker, though that massive energy dump is going to hurt like a mother…..!!!  The Magtech 185 gr in example 3 was the opposite in the worst way.  Suffice it to say, neither of these would be my go-to defensive cartridge.

OK, since I’m playing around trying to amuse myself, let’s see what some of the other oddball loadings in 9mm Luger and .40 S&W have to offer.

Example #8:  9mm Luger 50 gr Liberty Civil Defense at 2034 fps yields muzzle energy of 459 ft-lbs and average penetration of only 9.6 inches.  Expansion was also dismal and came in at .37 inches.

Example #9:  9mm Luger 92.6 gr Magtech SCHP First Defense at 1330 fps giving 364 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle and penetrating an average of 12.9 inches. Average expansion was at least decent at .54″.  This one might be a contender if there were not better options available, at least in my humble opinion.  Such as…

Example #10:  9mm 115 gr Corbon JHP +P at 1221 fps yields 381 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle and penetrated an average of 13.6 inches into the ballistic gelatin.  The bullet expansion was also decent at .56″

Example #11 and #12:  124 gr Remington Golden Saber +P clocks in at 1170 fps with a calculated muzzle energy of 377 foot-pounds.  Average penetration was a tad high at 18.2″ and expansion came in at .66 inches, getting close to doubling the original bullet diameter (.356″).  This one may be one the best of the 9mm bunch.  Incidentally, the Federal 124 gr HST +P was almost an identical performer in every aspect.  I would not have any issue with carrying either of these in my defensive weapon.

Example #13:  9mm Luger 135 gr Hornady Critical Duty +P running at 1118 fps and giving a muzzle energy of 375 ft-lbs and penetrating fairly deep at 18.1 inches and expanded to an average .47″.  Curiously the non +P loading of the same 135 gr FTX bullet had a deeper average penetration of 19.0 inches and only expanded to .43 inches.  It is probably worthy to note that these particular cartridges were designed to give “Barrier Blind” performance, being able to penetrate materials like glass windshields and sheet metal or fiberglass car doors without deforming significantly, so they are likely a bit more resistant to expanding.

How about a heavier 9mm load:

Example #14:  9mm Luger 147 gr Federal HST +P at 1008 fps gives us 332 foot-pounds muzzle energy and penetrates to an average 19.2 in in ballistic gelatin. Average penetration into ballistic gel stops at 19.2″ and expansion is good at an even .60 inches.

If bullet expansion is your thing, check out these new-ish 9mm Luger offerings:

Example #15:  9mm Winchester 147 gr Ranger T-Series.  This one may seem rather weak with a MV of 941 fps and calculated muzzle energy of only 289 ft-lbs, but its expansion is impressive at .74″ on average more than doubling its original diameter and still penetrating the ballistic gelatin to an average of 16.5 inches.

Example #16:  9mm Federal 150 gr Micro HST.  Another relatively low velocity cartridge putting out a muzzle velocity of 888 feet per second, translating into a mere 263 ft-lbs of muzzle energy.  Still, penetration into ballistic gel is more than adequate at 17.3″ and expansion is also very good at .71″.

OK, now for some more .40 cal loads:

Example #17:  .40 Cal. S&W 60 gr Liberty Civil Defense is once again the fastest at 1846 feet per second yielding a muzzle energy of ….454 foot pounds, the same as the fastest 165 gr bullet!  Have we reached critical mass?  Is there no greater return on our investment of giving up bullet weight for greater velocity to produce tremendous energy?  Let’s get heavy and try another:

Example #18:  .40 Cal. 180 gr Winchester Defender coming out at a 5 shot average velocity of 995 fps and has 396 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle.

I mentioned in the forum that I carry a Glock 23 daily which is of course a .40 S&W.  Are you wondering how my carry ammo stacks up?  Here it is:

Example #19: .40 Cal. 180 gr Remington Ultimate Defense BJHP runs 977 feet per second and yields a muzzle energy of 381 ft-lbs. and penetrated an average of 15.5 inches into the ballistic gel after passing through 4 layers of fabric… with all 5 test bullets stopping right smack in the middle of the FBI’s standard of 12-18 inches.

Not too shabby!  Except that my muzzle energy is now exactly the same as that Corbon 115 gr +P 9mm round… Uh oh!  So do I need to give up my Glock 23 and buy a Glock 19?  Not so fast, there are other things to consider.  Remember me mentioning bullet performance earlier?  That Corbon 9mm penetrated 13.6 inches whereas my Ultimate Defense came in at 15.5 inches on average.  Additionally and perhaps more importantly, the 9mm Corbon JHP +P expanded to .56 inches but the .40 Cal Remington Ultimate Defense expanded to .79 inches… nearly twice its original diameter!

So I suppose I do need to stop spouting off my pat answer about the .40 having more energy than the 9mm as there are some 9mm+P cartridges that deliver similar energy results to the .40 caliber.  But this is only in some instances and then not by a considerable amount.  But I do have a new answer to the original question:  Size Matters!!!  When comparing the .40 to the 9mm+P, I have about the same energy, but get better bullet expansion in my preferred load. Also, when comparing my beloved .40 S&W to the .45 ACP, those .45’s start out big and most have tremendous expansion, but the .45 moves along very slow and actually imparts less energy to its target.

Would I change anything about my current setup?  Probably not my EDC, since Smith and Wesson doesn’t make a true G19/G23-sized pistol that I can get all my fingers on the actual grip frame without having my finger on a magazine extension.  But when they do, I’m all in!  As for bullet choice, I’m going to stick with the .40 for now.  However, since looking at some of the newer tested factory offerings, I am going to take a closer look at at least a couple more:

Example #20:  The .40 S&W 165 gr JHP Winchester Ranger Bonded.  Muzzle velocity=1098 fps resulting in 442 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle.  Penetration is right where it should be (according to the FBI) with all 5 test rounds stopping right in the meat of that magical 12-18 inches and averaging 14.7 inches.  Couple that with an average bullet expansion to .77″ and this sounds like a potential all-time winner.  Also of note is another new offering in Federals HST line of ammunition:

Example #21:  .40 cal 155 gr Federal HST.  Muzzle velocity is 1084 fps yielding 404 ft-lbs of muzzle energy.  5 shot average penetration is 17.2″ and average expansion is at .67″, so it looks like there was a little trade off giving up some expansion for greater penetration.

I’ve heard it said going around in several gun shops that the .40 S&W is dead.  Don’t you believe it!  True, several agencies are transitioning away from .40 and are either going to 9mm Luger or .45 ACP.  I’m not sure which “expert of the month” they are taking advice from or if their motive is cost-based.  But in my personal opinion, I think they should take another look at the .40 S&W.  In most duty pistols, it has nearly the same magazine capacity.  For instance, 15+1 in the Glock 22 vs. 17+1 in the Glock 17 while offering substantially more terminal effectiveness.  Whereas there seems to be little to no effective gain in a move to .45 ACP.  (Are you listening NCPD)?

It has been said that in compromise, neither party gets what it wants.  Funny, I think that with the .40 Smith & Wesson, I get exactly what I want!

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Merry Christmas

We want to wish you a very merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous New Year in 2017.  We are looking forward to organizing some group meet ups in 2017 and hope to meet some new members when we do that.  As legally armed citizens and gun owners in South Carolina I am hopeful that each of us will get involved in supporting organizations like South Carolina Carry.  South Carolina Carry is a grassroots, non profit organization that is focusing on protecting our 2nd amendment rights.

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The Rules by Jeffrey Phipps

The Rules

I’ve been involved with firearms, be it through work or play, for all of my adult life.  I have seen many negligent discharges (accident infers nobody was to blame) in my time.  I’ve also seen catastrophic failures on the firing line.  In my teaching career, I refer to experience as knowledge gained immediately after it was first needed.  Armed with this experience, I am passionate about safety.  Not everyone shares this passion.

If you have been to a formal firing range, you have likely seen the Four Safety Rules posted.  Most shooters pay lip service to these rules: Treat every firearm as if it is loaded.  Never point a firearm at anything you are not willing to destroy/kill.  Know your target and what is beyond it.  Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.  Then we see poor trigger and muzzle discipline, with shooters often flagging (military speak for unintentionally pointing your firearm at someone) everyone on the firing line.

You may ask “What does any of this have to do with daily carry of a firearm?”  I’d reply “Only EVERYTHING.”  Training is learning what to do.  Practice is perfecting techniques in which you’ve been trained.  If you have not been trained to carry and present a concealed firearm properly, how can you expect to carry it safely?  Carrying a loaded pistol requires us to follow the first rule.  It’s loaded.  If it isn’t, you’re carrying a really cool paperweight.  I see folks ‘practicing the draw from concealment’ at the range.  I see them point their loaded pistol at their hand, their leg, their foot and the person beside them.  Don’t be That Guy!  Start with a quality holster, then draw it straight up and point it out.  Practice this with your empty gun at home, it’ll pay off.

Trigger discipline is a key unto itself.  A good friend of mine from my Air Force days was known to say “Keep your nose-picker off the bang switch.”  It makes sense.  When you draw your pistol from the aforementioned quality holster, your grip should have your trigger finger along the frame of your pistol, not on or inside the trigger guard.  Once you are pointed at the target, know what’s beyond it (collateral damage is not just frowned upon in war), THEN you move your finger to the trigger.

While all of this seems like common sense, it is important to remind ourselves to take care of these actions.  When we are at the range people are watching us.  Not all of them like guns or people that carry them.  We must be a good example of safe, responsible owners.

Jeffrey Phipps is a 21+ year USAF veteran with extensive firearms experience.  He is a NRA certified Pistol Instructor, an Emergency Vehicle Operations Instructor, a Motorcycle Safety Foundation RiderCoach (safety instructor) and a Captain in a South Carolina Lowcountry fire department.

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Myths About Self-Defense by The Cornered Cat blog

The Myths:

Go to The Cornered Cat to read the rest of this excellent article. 

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